Prospectus

The Plant Medicine School Prospectus

 

 

 

 

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Prospectus

 

 

Table of Contents

The Plant Medicine School Prospectus 1

Table of Contents 2

The Apprenticeship in Community Herbal/Botanical Medicine. 6

Year 1 - Starting on The Plant Medicine Path. 7

Year 2 - Deepening the Medicine. 8

Course Leader and Founder 9

Sister Schools Leaders and course mentors: 10

Fees: See Local Schools 10

The Autumn and Summer face-to-face immersions. 11

Certification. 11

Course Ethos and Aim.. 12

Course requirements, who can sign up for the course?. 13

Course dates 14

Course Structure. 14

Schedules of Study. 16

Year 1 Starting on The Plant Medicine Path. 16

Access to Unit 1 October 16

Access to Unit 2 November 16

Access to Unit 3 January. 17

Access to Unit 4 February. 17

Access to Unit 5 March. 17

Access to Unit 6 April 18

Materia medica. 18

Year Two Deepening the Medicine. 19

Access to Unit 1 October 19

Access to Unit 2 November 20

Access to Unit 3 January. 20

Access to Unit 4 February. 20

Access to Unit 5 March. 21

Access to Unit 6 April 21

Herbs studied in 2nd Year: 21

The Practitioner Training Programme (established 2010) 22

Course structure and layout 23

Seminar blocks and lectures. 23

Self-directed study. 23

Clinical observation and practice. 23

Expected cost of training. 24

Lecturers: 25

Assessment is by completion of: 25

Programme Schedule. 26

Practitioner Programme induction session-September 26

Year 3. 26

Year 4. 27

September Inclusivity, sustainability and decolonisation. 27

November Psycho-emotional health. 28

December Acute medicine and paediatrics 28

January Therapeutics for Elders. 28

February Reproductive health, pregnancy, and childbirth. 28

March Therapeutics for elder part 2. 28

April Chronic inflammatory disease. 28

Practice Management and ethics. 29

July and August 29

Year 5. 29

Zoom tutorials and lectures. 29

Core Curriculum fulfilment 30

Core Curriculum Required areas of study. 30

Human Sciences - 250 hours. 30

Nutrition - 80 hours. 30

Clinical Sciences - 350 hours 31

Plant Chemistry and Pharmacology - 80 hours. 31

Pharmacognosy and dispensing 80 hours. 31

Practitioner development and ethics 40 hours. 32

Practitioner research - 80 hours 32

The specific herbal tradition 1150 hours 32

Field work 50 hours. 33

Clinical practice 500. 33

Total Hours. 34

Core curriculum subjects covered in Year 1. 34

Core Curriculum subjects studied in Year 2. 35

Core curriculum subjects covered in years 3-5. 36

Local School Pages 42

The Plant Medicine School - Cork 42

Course leaders and Mentors. 42

Fees 42

Location and accommodation: 42

Recognition of PEL for course entry in the second year 42

The Plant Medicine School - Exmoor 44

Course leader 44

Mentors 44

Fees 44

Location and accommodation: 44

Recognition of PEL for course entry in the second year 44

Plant Medicine School Scotland (est. 2021) 46

Grass Roots Remedies Cooperative lead the School in Scotland. 46

Link to the Grassroots site ‘About Us’ page. 46

Course Mentors - Scotland – Bio’s are on the ‘About Page’ 46

Fees. 46

Additional Costs for Students: 47

Location and accommodation: 47

Books and Equipment 47

Recognition of PEL for course entry in the second year 48

How Do I Book Onto the Course?. 49

The Plant Medicine School Wexford. 50

Course leader 50

Mentors 50

Bios are in ‘The Team’ section of the website. 50

Fees. 50

Location and accommodation: 50

Recognition of PEL for course entry in the second year 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Apprenticeship in Community Herbal/Botanical Medicine

(established 2008)

“Sustainable medicine for the future, respecting and reconnecting with the natural world”

The Apprenticeship is a practical experiential course, focusing on working with plants as a traditional medicine in the community circle. It is also the foundation training for those wishing to progress to the practitioner training programme. It is a 2-year programme designed for those who wish to empower themselves to work with plant medicines for themselves, their community, and their environment.

The programme weaves together the art and science of herbalism, reclaiming old ways of healing and bringing these into the 21st century as valuable healthcare.

The need to move into a more balanced relationship with the rest of nature and more sustainable ways of being is very apparent; the Apprenticeship focuses on local indigenous and naturalised plants, those that grow around us. Some more exotic species are also studied since people and plants have been travelling the world for thousands of years. We will look at our own traditional systems of healing, whilst examining some energetic systems from other regions.

We incorporate many aspects of plant medicine - herbalism, aromatherapy, working with the plants as sentient healers, flower essences and more. We examine other aspects of the relationship between humans and plants – wild food and herbs in the diet, using plants for fibre, dyes, cosmetics, shelter, fuel, and other applications. We are passionate about developing sustainable herbal medicine, encouraging the promotion of biodiversity and the protection of our ecosystem, whilst helping to bring us back into remembering our place in the web of nature and into a healthy relationship with the Earth.

We include lifestyle, hydration, relaxation and breathing techniques, the language we use and much more. The emphasis is on practical, experiential knowledge that the student can apply in their own life. This will be backed up by the theoretical knowledge necessary to give an in depth understanding of plant medicine and its safe and respectful application.

 

 

 

Year 1 - Starting on The Plant Medicine Path

The first year helps you to learn about the plants, their healing properties, how to grow them, harvest them sustainably and make medicine from them; using direct perception to learn about our plant allies is a central theme to the course.

·      History and philosophy – the roots of healing; history of medicine and herbal medicine; reductionism and the place of science; different approaches to science and consilience; traditional uses of plants by our ancestors; comparison of core techniques and wisdom from different cultures; the sacred ordinary and plants as spiritual beings and healers.

·      Ethics - the healer’s way: Rigorous self-examination; the ego and holism.

·      How plants work: Botany, ecology, habitats, habitat restoration, sustainable use, the web of nature, chemistry, how plants make medicine, cultivation, and sustainable wild crafting.

·      Herbal pharmacy: Plant constituents, processing and making therapeutic preparations.

·      Materia medica: the holistic therapeutics of medicinal plants and their different forms (including infusions, tinctures, essential oils, aromatic waters, macerated oils, talcs, salts, smudge, incense, syrups, vinegars).

·      Energetics and working with the plants to heal spiritually, mentally, emotionally, and physically

Year 2 - Deepening the Medicine

In the second year we focus on therapeutics, relating the medicine of herbs to human wellness

It includes the following areas:

·      The miracle of the human being and helping people re-balance their health on all levels

·      How the human works in health and illness – a holistic view of anatomy, physiology, and pathology; we investigate cultural aspects of disease and attitudes to different health problems, the symbolism and metaphysics of wellness and of disease

·      Systems therapeutics and Materia medica, including herbs, aromatic waters, essential oils, nutrition, and lifestyle

·      Traditional energetic approaches and cutting-edge scientific discoveries

·      Ancillary techniques such as breath work, body unwinding, visualization and much more

 

No-one enjoys dry and stuffy study. Although this course covers some intensely complex and deep material (we are after all talking about some of the most complex beings on the face of the planet), it is hoped that it will be fun, amusing, demanding and enjoyable. Learning conducted this way sticks and embeds better! The study will be a journey and an adventure which may change your life and will definitely change some of your perceptions and perspectives. You will learn more about clarity and perception, experience how to bridge the scientific and spiritual approach and meet yourself through working with the plants. The study of the art and science of herbal medicine is a tradition that spans thousands of years, is continually evolving and can be guaranteed to provide stimulation for at least one lifetime; the more you learn, the more you find there is to learn and enjoy….

 

Please note that this is a foundation course, and that it does not qualify you to practice on the public as a medical herbalist who diagnoses and dispenses extemporaneous prescription.

For those wishing to take their studies further progression onto the Practitioner Training programme is dependent upon successful completion of the Apprenticeship including continuous assessment of capacities and aptitudes.

 

Course Leader and Founder

Nikki Darrell - medical herbalist, botanist, aromatherapist. She is a practitioner, educationalist, writer, campaigner, and grower. She has been working with plants for over 45 years.

 

Sister Schools Leaders and course mentors:

Cork

Exmoor

Scotland

Wexford

 

 

Fees: See Local Schools

The fees cover access to online material, including videos, lectures, and notes; mentoring sessions; zoom class tutorials; the immersion face-to-face classes; herb samples and herb supplies used in class and plants for students to work with at home (the plants are given out at the workshops). It includes a vegan lunch for each study day and refreshments.

There are payment plans available for people wishing to pay their fees in instalments.

Location and accommodation: See local schools

The Autumn and Summer face-to-face immersions

There are two 3-day face-to-face immersion classes which are in person, one in October/November and the second in May/June.

There are 6 Zoom class tutorials sessions each year to allow students to interact with the tutors and each other. These give an opportunity for cohort learning and community building, sharing experiences, asking questions, and addressing selected topics.

Students are supported by a mentor who gives a minimum of 10 hours mentoring per year to help them complete assignments and engage with the studies. Mentoring includes 2 one to one sessions on Zoom or phone as a minimum, answering questions and giving support on the path of self-directed study and identifying learning modes and intelligences.

The online studies for the Apprenticeship consist of the filmed lectures and practical sessions plus course notes to ensure that all the materials presented in the videos are covered.

The student undertakes formative assignments and has these assessed by their mentor. In addition, they can discuss any areas where they need extra assistance with their mentor. All mentors have undertaken the Apprenticeship and have plenty of experience of herbal practice.

Certification

Only students who have undertaken the two years, attended the immersions (or provided documented evidence that they have acquired similar training in their locality), submitted their assignments and passed all elements of the continuous assessment will be awarded a certificate of completion.

Students wishing to become full clinical practitioners can then apply to undertake a further 3 years clinical training and study to gain the Herbal Practitioner Diploma.

Undertaking the Apprenticeship and Clinical Training Programme, completing all course assignments and requirements and passing the final clinical exam gives a sufficient level of training (complying with the IRH core curriculum) to enable graduates to apply for full membership of the IRH, and the CPP and to apply to NIMH via the individual registration route. The School is continuing to work with other professional organisations to enable students to join them.

Course Ethos and Aim

Our aim is to provide experiential, enjoyable training in an apprenticeship model. Our teachers and tutors are well experienced in their fields. We pride ourselves in providing a blend of scientific and traditional training with an emphasis on using local plant medicines sustainably. Our training gives students a knowledge of the plant from field to pharmacy and a blend of clinical and energetic approaches to the people and the medicines that the plants provide. We have a strong interest in community, in sustainability and traditional knowledge and wisdom so these are woven through the course material and teaching approaches.

We are a nature-centred enterprise and educational establishment and as such we focus on environmentally and ecologically sustainable medicines and practices.

We focus on participatory education practices which enable students to mature into self-directed practitioners of their area of work whether it be as a grower, medicine maker and formulator, educationalist teaching workshops, creative artist or clinical practitioner.

We are passionate about nurturing the individual towards becoming a fully realised member of the community, recognising that community is essential for success and therefore fostering egalitarian and peaceful communication and collaboration is core to our training.

Students are not permitted to use class time (whether face to face or on Zoom) or discussion forums to promote their own business, workshops or products without first gaining permission from their school principal.

The promotion of illegal activities in any of these settings is also not permitted. Whatever the personal views of students or staff regarding which plants/mushrooms are legal or illegal to use the school cannot permit the discussion or promotion of illegal activity.

 

Course requirements, who can sign up for the course?

The course is open to anyone with basic skills in reading, writing, and speaking English since all the course material is written in this language. Since this is a blended course with online content, students need a computer, tablet, or smart phone to access this material although it is preferable to have a computer or tablet rather than a phone to work on. Basic skills regarding internet navigation, bookmarking, document downloading, editing, and printing are all required. Computer skill courses are available in adult education centres, contact your library or citizens advice for local details.

Further details on recognition of PEL for entry into the second year in the local schools information

 

Course dates

The Apprenticeship courses run from October to June each year with gaps for Christmas and Easter. A full schedule of dates is sent out with the application form link.

The Clinical training programme commences in September and some training clinics are held over the summer period to allow students to get the required 500 hours of supervised clinical training. Some training clinics are held virtually on Zoom allowing students to attend a wide range of them.

 

Course Structure

The first stage is structured as a two-year foundation apprenticeship leading to a certificate in community herbal medicine. The first year contains 10 modules plus study of about 80 plants. The second year contains 11 modules and a further 80+ plants are introduced.

For those who wish to become clinical practitioners there is a further three-year Practitioner Training programme, incorporating self-directed study, lectures, and supervised clinic training. Progression to the Practitioner training is dependent upon displaying the capacity for this level of training during the continuous assessment carried out over the Apprenticeship training and therefore there is a second enrolment process at this point.

Only those completing the two tiers have fulfilled the core curriculum requirements for entry to the Irish Register of Herbalists (IRH), the Professional Organisation that accredits the training. Graduates can also apply to the CPP or undergo the individual accreditation process to join NIMH.

Students who can demonstrate sufficient prior experiential learning may be accepted onto the Clinical Training Programme from routes other than the Plant Medicine School Apprenticeship.

The School also runs CPD courses open to graduates of the School’s Diploma and from other trainings. Some lectures and seminars are open to individuals looking for bridging training to allow them to be grand parented into the IRH.

The training is designed to be experiential, incorporating a lot of hands-on learning in conjunction with lectures, classes, demonstrations, and self-directed study. The core emphasis of the course is an in-depth knowledge of the plants and their value for health, food, and medicine alongside developing a good knowledge of the human condition both energetically and clinically. Field work, pharmacy practice and clinical work form a large part of the training. The ethos of the practice taught is sustainable holistic community based herbal practice.

 

Schedules of Study

Year 1 Starting on The Plant Medicine Path

Access to online materials is spread over 6 units to facilitate progressive studies at a manageable pace and one continues to have online access for the course duration after graduation; this means one can study at one’s own convenience and one is not tied to specific viewing times.

About 10 days after access is given there is a zoom tutorial to allow discussions and to do some cohort learning exercises; attendance at these tutorials (held from 7.00- 8.30pm) is essential learning. The times below give a broad idea of the access dates, but a detailed schedule will be provided when you apply for the course.

Personal development and growth will be explored with the students as the course progresses.

Access to Unit 1 October

We introduce the basic forms of herbal medicines (teas, infusions, decoctions, syrups, tinctures, infused oils, vinegars, creams and ointments etc). We start to examine nonlinear approaches to science and to learning about our plant allies. We will explore the history of herbal medicine and of science and start to explore the healer’s path. We also introduce Nature Resonance as a way of attaining direct perception from the plants. Herb profiles.

Access to Unit 2 November

How plants work; botany or the anatomy and physiology of plants, taxonomy or the name of plants and their families; the place of plants in the ecosystem; their role in creating, feeding, and sustaining life; plants and people. Organoleptics; identifying constituents by taste and smell. Sprouting seeds for nutritional benefits.

Access to Unit 3 January

Herbal pharmacy, making medicines and understanding plant constituents; Hygiene and Good Manufacturing Practice, including the place of intention. Macerated oils cold and hot methods; Creams and ointments, plaisters, talcs and salts, vinegars, syrups, oxymels, electuaries, pills, tinctures, capsules, and powders. Blending creams and essential oils; the concepts of blending herbs; carrier oils and aromatic waters. Understanding atoms (basic chemistry), capturing sunlight (photosynthesis), making molecules, how plants make their therapeutic compounds.

Access to Unit 4 February

Energetics and philosophy, plant spirit medicine, Galen’s 4 temperaments and 4 qualities, TCM energetics and the 5 elements; the three cauldrons; Comparisons of the systems of energetics; similarities and differences. Developing a new energetic paradigm. Making Flower essences, Smoke cleansing and fumigation, and aromatics.

Access to Unit 5 March

Growing and tending; Cultivation and plant recognition (revises some botany); Field growing, growing under cover, wild crafting. Sowing seeds, suitable soil types and habitats, cuttings and other methods of propagation. Trees and tree essences. Revisiting the healing path

Access to Unit 6 April

Harvesting, drying and processing. Gathering herbs sustainably – seed saving, wild crafting responsibly. Processing; revises some of the preparations from weekend 3. Producing therapeutic foods – devising recipes for optimum nutrition.

Materia medica

Herbs studied in first year:

Achillea millefolium, Aesculus hippocastanum, Ajuga reptans, Alchemilla vulgaris, Allium sativum, Angelica archangelica, Arctium lappa, Artemisia sp, Avena sativa, Betula sp, Calendula officinalis, Chamaenerion angustifolium, Cinnamomum verum, Citrus species, Corylus avellana, Crataegus laevatiga, Dianthus caryophyllus, Eucalyptus species, Eugenia caryophyllum, Euphrasia officinalis, Fagus sylvatica, Filipendula ulmaria, Foeniculum vulgare, Galium aperine/odoratum, Geranium robertianum, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Hamamelis virginiana, Inula helenium, Juniperus communis, Kalanchoe pinnata, Lavandula officinalis, Linum usitassimum, Levisticum officinale, Malus domestica, Matricaria recutita, Medicago sativa, Melissa officinalis, Mentha sp., Origanum vulgare, Pelargonium species, Pinus sylvestris, Plantago lanceolata/major/psyllium, Primulas, Quercus robur, Ribes nigrum, Rosa damascena, Rosmarinus officinalis, Rubus idaeus, Rumex crispus/ obtusifolius, Salvia officinalis, Salix sp., Sambucus nigra, Stachys betonica, Stellaria media, Symphytum officinale, Taraxacum officinale, Thymus vulgaris, Tilia sp., Trifolium pratense, Urtica dioica, Vaccinium myrtillus, Valeriana officinalis, Verbena officinalis, Viola sp, Zingiber officinale

The study of the materia medica will be distributed over the year and there may be some variation and additions to the plants listed above; we will examine the physical, mental, emotional, and holistic properties of the plant; focus is on local, indigenous, and naturalised plants and those that can be easily grown in Ireland. Some more exotic species will be included where relevant.

We are constantly evolving the course and adding more plants to meet so there may be some variation in the herbs studied from those listed above.

 

Year Two Deepening the Medicine

At each weekend, new herbs will be introduced for the system being studied; herbs from the first year with relevance will also be revised. Formulations and prescriptions for conditions relating to the system under discussion will be made up. There will be opportunities to practice consultation skills, pulse and tongue diagnosis, and work with the ancillary techniques that are introduced at each weekend. As well as looking at disease processes, there will also be an examination of the symbolism of diseases, of cultural aspects of disease, of energetic approaches and of developing new energetic paradigms

Access to Unit 1 October

·      Introducing the Miracle of The Human Body, Our Community of Cells.

·      Introducing Disease Processes and The Symbolism of Disease

·      Herbs for The Whole Body Including Adaptogens, nutritive tonics and Alteratives. Introduction of New Herbs and Revision of Herbs From Year 1. Making preparations for Whole Body Treatments – Massage Blends, Bath Blends, Herb Ball for Hot Herb Massage.

·      Consultation Skills; Questioning; Incorporating Energetic Principles; Sensory Acuity as A Way of Enhancing Consultation and of Understanding the Therapeutics of Our Plant Allies

Access to Unit 2 November

The Heart of the matter and circulation; the heart as an endocrine organ; the heart as a brain; the heart as an organ of perception; heart entrainment; the circulation as a communication system within the body.

Lymphatic/immune system – defence and waste disposal - visualisations

Access to Unit 3 January

The Skin or Integumentary System: Our largest organ, our boundary between the external and the internal environment; Dry skin brushing

The Neuroendocrine System and special senses: The RAS, the Triune brain and peripheral nervous system; Our 6 brains, plus the possibility of others; Sensory acuity in the consultation process and in accessing information about the herbs; Olfaction; Visualisation and relaxation techniques; Stress management

Access to Unit 4 February

Muscles and bones, the Musculoskeletal Systems: Stretching, yawning, and reaching out; Psychological and physical holding patterns; Myofascial unwinding techniques; The ancestors and our bones

The Respiratory System: Oxygen, the primary nutrient; The lungs and grief; Learned breathing habits and breathing exercises to establish healthy breathing patterns

Access to Unit 5 March

Digestion and the Digestive System: The Gut brain, Wild food, Healthy gut flora, Fasting and much more besides

The Urinary System: The kidneys as an endocrine organ; The culture of fear (the primary emotion associated with the kidneys); Hydration

Access to Unit 6 April

·      The Neuroendocrine System, another mode of internal and external communication and the wider hormonal system

·      Reproduction, Pregnancy, the cycles of birth, life, death, and rebirth

Herbs studied in 2nd Year:

Aloe vera, Aloysia triphylla, Anethum graveolens, Armoracia rusticana, Asclepias tuberosa, Asparagus officinalis, Astragalus membranaceus/mongholicus, Azadirachta indica, Beta vulgaris, Berberis Sp., Brassica sp., Borago officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Capsicum mimimum, Carum carvi, Centella asiatica, Cetraria islandica, Chondrus crispus, Cimicifuga racemosa, Codonopsis pilosa, Coffea arabica, Coriandrum sativum, Curcuma longa, Cyanara scolymus, Echinacea Sp., Elettaria cardamomum, Eleuthroccocus senticosus, Erythrea centaurea, Fagopyrum esculentum, Fucus vesiculosis, Fumaria Officinalis, Gentiana lutea, Glechoma hederacea, Hedera helix, Humulus lupulus, Hypericum perforatum, Hyssopus officinalis, Lactuca virosa, Leonorus cardiaca, Lycopus sps, Marrubium vulgare, Menyanthes trifoliata, Ocimum basilicum, Ocimum sanctum, Olea europea, Parietaria diffusa, Passiflora incarnata, Pimpinella anisum, Piper nigrum, Prunella vulgaris, Prunus serotina, Pulmonaria officinalis, Rhodiola, Schisandra, Scutellaria lateriflora, Tanacetum parthenium, Theobroma cacao, Tropaeolum majus, Tussilago farfara, Verbascum thapsus, Viburnum opulus, Vitex agnus castus, Withania somniferum

 

On completion of the two-year foundation apprenticeship with students can apply to progress to The Clinical Practitioner Training Programme.

 

 

The Practitioner Training Programme (established 2010)

The objective of the Programme is to provide training for students to become practitioners of Vocational Western Herbal Medicine and to be able to join a professional organisation such as the Irish Register of Herbalists. The programme is designed to be completed in 3 years although some students choose to complete it in 2 years and other take 4 or more years. There is no extra cost to taking longer to complete it unless additional attendance at lectures or tutor support is required.

Course structure and layout

The training programme consists of three elements:

Seminar blocks and lectures

There are 2 five-day seminar blocks face to face in the first year, one 4 day one in the second year; video lectures in specific areas of therapeutics; 20 two hour tutorials on Zoom on systems therapeutics and specialities plus additional pop up lectures and tutorials held face to face.

 

Self-directed study

This element follows a carefully designed study plan to guide students through the topics. This will be assessed by continuous assessment consisting of a study portfolio and some long essays. Assessments are designed to allow the student to display the ability to weave together the different strands of their learning to formulate a diagnosis and treatment plan. Students will be expected to include relevant elements of their prior learning with the information delivered in the lecture blocks, tutorials, course notes, and teaching days.

 

Clinical observation and practice

500 hours of clinical training will be required. 60 are gained during the Apprenticeship. 100 hours of clinical observation need to be completed before conducting consultations on patients in training clinic. The remaining 340 hours can be split between the training clinics set up in various locations in Ireland and the UK; some clinic hours may be completed with individual herbal practitioners other than those on the list once this has been discussed with the course co-ordinator. Various practitioners are offering supervised hours and enrolled students will be put in touch with these. Students may also negotiate to undertake hours with other practitioners with the agreement of the course coordinator (however, practitioners must have 5 years clinical experience and recognised training).

Once these three elements of the training are completed students will be eligible to sit their final assessments. The successful completion of this will enable them to become practitioners. It must be emphasised that whilst every assistance will be offered to students to complete the training there will be a need for students to be able to undertake a disciplined approach to the self-directed element of the course and to ensuring that they get full clinical hours etc to sit the final exam. It should be possible to offer some tutorial assistance with the self-directed learning. If a student fails the final practical examination they will be able to re-sit; however, the cost of re-examination is not included in the course fee.

 

Expected cost of training

€3800.00, including final clinical exam but not including clinical training which is paid to the individual supervisors. This is to allow students flexibility in where they obtain their clinical training. It is estimated that it would cost each student around €1800 for the requisite 500 hours over 62 days since most practitioners charge €30.00 for an 8-hour day. At present clinics being run virtually are mostly two-hour sessions and the guide charge for these is €10.00 per session.

 

Lecturers:

The core team of lecturers are Nikki Darrell, Marie Reilly, Andrew Chevallier, Jane Wallwork, and Christine Herbert, with other lecturers offering teaching from time to time.

The college endeavours to provide an eclectic and broad view of the Western tradition with some understanding of the energetic paradigms of TCM and Ayurvedic medicine systems. The emphasis is on incorporating and reclaiming traditional approaches with an understanding of the value of clinical medicine and the ability to include research evidence. Science, intuition, tradition, food medicine and patient education are all incorporated into the practitioner paradigm. The students are encouraged to grow and prepare their own medicines as well as being taught about sourcing good quality medicines from ethical sources. They are encouraged to hone plant identification skills with regular plant identification walks in the gardens and have plenty of practical sessions on making medicines in clinic.

 

Assessment is by completion of:

15 case studies

10 written assignments on clinical medicine

10 written assignments on therapeutics

Completion of reflective journal

25 plant profiles building on the ones completed in the Apprenticeship

Nutrition assignments building on those completed in the Apprenticeship

Research project

Business plan

Continuous assessment of progress in consultations with student progress forms giving feedback from clinic supervisor

The final examination is held after the 5th year is completed and the portfolio of work has been presented.

 

Programme Schedule

Practitioner Programme induction session-September

The induction session’s aim is to orientate students in their studies and explain how to undertake the 3 strands of learning and get the most out of the course.

 

Year 3

Required Equipment: Stethoscope (Litmann classic III is the only one worth getting), patella hammer, tuning fork, blood pressure monitor or sphygmomanometer (manual, not electronic), neurological pin

 

·      Clinical Examination Seminar 1 (five days) in September/October with three days on physical examination skills for the abdomen, cardiovascular system and respiratory system and two days on pulse and tongue diagnosis

·      Clinical Examination Seminar 2 (five days) March three days on physical examination of the musculoskeletal and neurological systems plus revision of other systems, 2 days on aromatic medicine techniques and formulation

·      October -July Systems therapeutics Zoom tutorials once a month, 10 in total

·      Clinical hours-150 minimum recommended

Year 4

·      Continuation of journals and plant profiles

·      Continuation of Case studies

·      150 hours supervised clinics

·      Starting research project and business plan

September Inclusivity, sustainability and decolonisation

Watch https://theplantmedicineschool.com/community/articles-and-interviews/decolonising-plant-medicine

Inclusivity, Accessibility and Diversity Decolonising our approaches and cultural studies Jane/Nikki

November Psycho-emotional health

Watch the recorded lectures

Zoom tutorial on Mental health

December Acute medicine and paediatrics

Watch the recorded lectures

Zoom tutorial on Acute medicine and paediatrics

January Therapeutics for Elders

Zoom tutorial

February Reproductive health, pregnancy, and childbirth

Zoom tutorial

 

March Therapeutics for elder part 2

April Chronic inflammatory disease

Zoom tutorial

Practice Management and ethics

Zoom tutorial

July and August

Revision of each system with additional information gleaned in training clinics and in studying the specialities.

Year 5

·      Continuation of journals and plant profiles

·      Completion of case studies

·      Completion of Research project

·      Business set up project

·      150 hours supervised clinics

Zoom tutorials and lectures

There will be recorded lectures to watch and zoom tutorials on various topics such as Diabetes, Menopause, Setting up in practice and business planning, Skin care, Thyroid health, The holistic approach and the role of psycho-emotional aspects in healthcare. There are 3 Zoom tutorials and the opportunity to join those from year 4 again to revise. There is also a two day intensive although most of the face to face contact in this year is expected to be taken in Wellness clinics.

 

The final assessment is held in March or December after the 5th year is completed and is on Zoom:

You need a volunteer to demonstrate taking pulses and BP and another physical examination- either respiratory or musculoskeletal since these are visible on zoom more easily than the others.  This part of the assessment should take about 10 minutes. There will then be 30 minutes of Q&A on topics like red flags, ethics and safety of practice, favourite herbs for XYZ and contraindications or cautions e.g. herbs for pregnancy etc. and also discussing some of your course work.

 

Core Curriculum fulfilment

Core Curriculum Required areas of study

Human Sciences - 250 hours

Year 2, 24 hours of lectures and 100 hours of home study with mandatory texts

Year 3, 20 hours of lectures (1-hour review at each therapeutics system lecture day, 10 hours during clinic examinations lecture days) and 90 hours’ home study with mandatory texts.

Assessment by completion of Anatomy and Physiology colouring book and also integrated into clinical medicine and therapeutics written assignments. Also, by class discussion.

Nutrition - 80 hours

Years 1-4, Class practical’s 53 hours, Years 1-3, 50 hours home study

Clinical Sciences - 350 hours

Year 2, 24 hours lectures

Year 3, 80 hours (two 40 hours lecture blocks on Clinical Sciences and additional 40 hours in the therapeutics by system tutorials)

Year 4, 80 hours’ tutorial sessions incorporated into clinical training

Home study Years 2-4, 200 hours

Structured home study of mandatory texts

Plant Chemistry and Pharmacology - 80 hours

Lectures and class practical Year 1 - 8 hours, Year 2 - 12 hours

Home study Years 1-4, 20 hours per year (80)

Assessment by class discussion groups and pharmacy/pharmacology journal

Pharmacognosy and dispensing 80 hours

Lectures and practical sessions

Year 1 - 8 hours

Year 2 - 20 hours

Year 3 - 20 hours

Home study Years 2 to 4 - 30 hours per year, 120.

Assessment by students being able to demonstrate the ability to dispense correctly and by class discussion regarding areas such as sourcing, labelling, stock taking and so on

Practitioner development and ethics 40 hours

Year 1, 8 hours lectures

Year 2, 8 hours lectures

Year 3, 8 hours lectures

Assessment Years 1-5 reflective journal and case study completion 200 hours

Practitioner research - 80 hours

Years 1-4 Lectures 12 hours each year

Home study - 50 hours per year, 250 hours

Assessment Research project 100+ hours

The specific herbal tradition 1150 hours

Year 1 - 64 hours lectures

Year 2 - 96 hours lectures

Year 3+4 - 200 hours lectures

Home study - 600 hours

Field work 50 hours

Year 1 - 12 hours practical sessions

Year 2 - 20 hours practical sessions

Year 3 - 20 hours practical sessions

Year 4 - 20 hours practical sessions

Home study - 150 hours

Clinical practice 500

Year 2 - 24 hours supervised clinic and practical

80 hours home study (writing up case studies, formulating cases and possible treatment strategies for discussion in class)

Year 3 -5 - 500 hours Supervised clinics and 300 hours home study (writing up case, reflective journaling)

Clinical observation and practice 500 hours of clinical training are required. 100 hours of this will be clinical observation. The remaining 400 hours can be split between the training clinics set up in various locations; of the 400 hours 150 may be completed with individual herbal practitioners once this has been discussed with the course co-ordinator. Various practitioners of sufficient experience and training are offering supervised hours and enrolled students will be put in touch with these. Students may also negotiate to undertake hours with other practitioners with the agreement of the course coordinator.

Total Hours

Class hours 890, home study, 2140, exceeding required study hours 2560

 

Core curriculum subjects covered in Year 1

Core curriculum subjects covered in Year 1 (Assignments listed separately)

Plant chemistry and Pharmacology

Pharmacognosy and dispensing

Practitioner development and Ethics

The Specific Herbal Tradition

Workshop 1: History, Materia Medicia, Practitioner Development, Botany, Chemistry, Materia Medica, Organolpetics

Workshop 2: Pharmacy, Medicine Making, Materia Medica, The Herbal Tradition (energetics), Materia Medica, Pharmacy and Dispensing

Workshop 3: Botany, Materia Medica, Field Work, Practitioner Development, Pharmacy, pharmacognosy, Herbal Tradition, Field Work

Assessment of the first year is by continuous assessment of formative assignments listed below. Students are encouraged to develop their own learning intelligences as a way of working with the plants and medicines. Journals can include writing, photographs, own formulae and recipes, researching formulae and recipes online, records of growing and plant identification with photographs or drawings or other methods discussed with the tutors and mentors.

Between weekends students are expected to work on their journals and work with the herb samples they receive, as well as studying the course notes (sometimes specific exercises are recommended, sometimes the students help design these exercises and primarily the students are encouraged to explore how to use their own skills and intelligences to deepen their knowledge and skills with the plants).

Core Curriculum subjects studied in Year 2

Human sciences (Anatomy physiology and pathophysiology)

Nutrition

Plant chemistry and pharmacology; plant herb interactions

Pharmacognosy and dispensing

The Specific Herbal Tradition

Clinical Practice observation 30 hours and home journaling

Practitioner research

Each weekend covers the 7 areas above in relation to specific body systems

Assessment includes home study of Ross and Wilson and completion of the accompanying colouring book for self-assessment. Nutrition study includes study of course nutrition notes, recommended texts and articles.

In addition, students continue their journals and bring case studies to class to discuss and draw up treatment plans. Students also start their own consultation practice under supervision in class, with an emphasis on using herbs and lifestyle advice to improve their own health and they continue this as part of their home study.

 

Core curriculum subjects covered in years 3-5

The remainder of the core curriculum subjects plus additional areas are covered in years 3-5

 

Module 1

Clinical Medicine, Clinical Examination and Differential Diagnosis Skills

Description: The main aims of this module are to teach the practical skills of clinical examination and case history taking; to provide learners with the theory and practical skills which enable them to perform differential diagnosis of signs and symptoms of the major body systems, including a thorough knowledge of clinical medicine and appropriate medical laboratory science.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module the learner will be able to:

Describe clinical examination diagnostic techniques and their clinical applications in orthodox medical practice

Demonstrate effective case history taking

Perform a clinical examination of the major body systems using palpation, auscultation, observation and other relevant techniques.

Recognise red flags (potentially serious signs and symptoms) and recognise when to refer patients to orthodox medical practitioners.

Describe diseases leading to the differential diagnosis of common symptoms and signs affecting the covering and support systems of the body (skin, joints and bones), control systems (nervous and endocrine), and maintenance systems (cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary systems)

Discuss the distribution of disease in the community and the approach to prevention from the orthodox and holistic points of view.

Interpret basic pathology laboratory data and results of orthodox investigative procedures.

Understand how to incorporate all the theory and skills learned in this module into an effective system of differential diagnosis.

 

Indicative Content:

The orthodox medical model; causes and mechanisms of disease, describing diseases, the principles of differential diagnosis.

Disorders of cells; local response to tissue injury; general response to tissue injury; disturbance of body response; infectious diseases.

Symptoms and signs related to diseases of the body systems (Skin, Musculoskeletal, Nervous, Special senses, Endocrine; Cardiovascular; Lymphatic and immune; Respiratory; Gastrointestinal; Genito-urinary; Reproductive)

Tests in clinical sciences – pathology tests on body fluids; blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, faeces. Investigative tests X-ray, CT, ultrasound, MRI

Physical examination; cardiovascular, respiratory, abdominal, neurological, musculoskeletal

 

Module 2

Integration of Traditional Specific Materia Medica, Nutrition and Other Approaches to Treatment Strategies in General Herbal Practice and Specialised Areas

Description: This module aims to integrate and build on the material medica, herbal therapeutics, nutrition and other therapeutic approaches studied prior to this to enable the learner to develop a rational and effective therapeutic strategy for their individual patients. The importance of understanding herb-herb interactions and herb-drug interactions, the suitability of nutritional approaches and other therapeutic factors for the individual patient’s condition will also be emphasised.

Learning outcomes: On successful completion of this module the learner will be able to:

Assess individual patient case histories and devise a suitable treatment strategy, including nutritional and lifestyle advice and suitable herbal prescription.

Ensure that the treatment strategy is suitable for the patient as regards their physiology, age, other special requirements and considering orthodox and other complementary treatments that are being followed concomitantly.

Conduct follow-up consultations with patients and adjust their treatment strategy as necessary through a course of treatment.

Display an understanding of applying herbal therapeutics in the following areas: gynaecology/obstetrics/reproductive health, paediatrics, psychoemotional health, dermatology, geriatrics, acute medicine, and in general practice.

Indicative content:

The botanical, pharmacognostic, pharmacological and therapeutic aspects of a minimum of 150 therapeutic plant species. For each remedy it’s indications for treatment. Contraindications, incompatibilities, interactions with other herbs and pharmaceutical drugs, posology for all groups will be covered. Plants will be discussed from a traditional therapeutic aspect, considering their traditional energetics; they will also be discussed from a modern scientific research perspective. Specific indications of plants will be discussed, as well as herb combinations and synergies. Plant remedies will be discussed from the perspective of conservation and sustainable production; there will be an emphasis on native species. The skills of building a synthesis of clinical diagnostic skills, energetic diagnostic skills, herbal prescription, nutritional and lifestyle advice for general practice and the specialities (paediatrics, dermatology, psycho-emotional health, gynaecology/obstetrics/reproductive health and geriatrics) will be developed through lectures, tutorials and practical exercises.

 

Module 3

Clinical Practice

Description: To promote the learner’s development of the full range of herbalist skills under the careful supervision of experienced herbal practitioners, including developing a herbal medicine treatment strategy, dispensing herbal medicines, dispensary management, health and safety aspects and practitioner development issues.

Learning outcomes: On successful completion of this module the learner will be able to demonstrate the following skills;

Herbal Medicine practical skills; dispensary administration, including ordering and stock rotation; herbal quality assessment and safe storage; weighing, packaging, labelling and safe dispensing of herbs in their various forms.

Practise and extend the theories of herbal medicine and develop diagnostic skills including: taking the case history (building rapport, clear questioning, good record keeping); making the diagnosis (including pathology and aetiology) according to the theories of herbal medicine; sensitivity to the patient and responsiveness to physical clues; appropriateness of the patient’s condition for treatment with herbal medicine; analysis of the patient’s condition from a herbal medicine perspective and the selection of the most appropriate formulae and herbs; modification of the herbal strategies used as the patient’s condition changes.

Patient-practitioner relationship skills; establishing good contact and building confidence and trust; providing information in everyday language/ language that the patient understands; time management.

Patient management skills; lifestyle monitoring and advice; limits to competence; referrals and recommendations; drug monitoring and management; response of the patient to herbal treatment; ethical considerations

Reflective practice; understanding the importance of reflection as a tool for learning and developing; reflective and self-directed learning and practice as a way to reach their full potential as a practitioner as regards effectiveness and satisfaction in their professional life.

Ethical practice; the student will develop a further understanding of the place of ethics and codes of practice and how to implement these ethics within clinical practice.

Indicative content: During clinical practice students will begin to practice the skills outlined above under learning outcomes. At first these skills will be practised with close supervision and support, but increasingly the students will be encouraged to formulate their own decisions regarding the diagnosis and treatment and the progress of the patient’s healing and recovery. Their judgements must then be checked with the clinical supervisor before action is taken. Students will also be expected to contribute to discussions on case histories.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Local School Pages

The Plant Medicine School - Cork

Course leaders and Mentors

Majella O Riordan and Siobhan Norton

Fees

The fees are €1800.00 per year (€3,600.00 in total), although there is a small admin fee in addition if paying in instalments.

Location and accommodation:

Rockgrove, Coachford, Co. Cork P12 N827

We do not provide accommodation, but there is a wide range available in the area.

Recognition of PEL for course entry in the second year

Prospective Students can go directly into Year 2 if they can demonstrate relevant Prior Experiential Learning (PEL), which covers the curriculum for Year 1. 

Students who have started their studies in Year 2 will be given access to the Year 1 material and will have to catch up on material from Year 1 in their own time to be able to demonstrate by the end of the Apprenticeship that they have covered the curriculum for both years. Gaps can also be filled in through workshops and personal learning outside the course, though this must be recorded and demonstrated to your mentor. 

Please also note that we can only accept students into Year 2 when space is available. We will prioritise continuing 1st Year students moving into Year 2. 

Feel free to contact us if you have relevant Previous Experiential Learning (PEL) from other courses or life experience and are interested in starting in Year 2. 

The Plant Medicine School Cork

Rockgrove

Coachford

Cork

Gorey

Ireland
P12 N827

 

cork@theplantmedicineschool.com
https://theplantmedicineschool.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Plant Medicine School - Exmoor

Course leader

Jane Wallwork

Mentors

Stacey Frampton

Chantal Baptiste

Fees

The fees are £1700.00 per year (£3,400.00 in total), although there is a small admin fee if paying in instalments.

Location and accommodation:

The Exmoor Apothecary, Little Hurstone, Waterrow, Somerset, TA4 2AT

We do not provide accommodation, but there is a wide range available in the area.

Recognition of PEL for course entry in the second year

Prospective Students can go directly into Year 2 if they can demonstrate relevant Prior Experiential Learning (PEL), which covers the curriculum for Year 1. The onus is upon the applicant to demonstrate their PEL and provide documentation of same.

Students who have started their studies in Year 2 will be given access to the Year 1 material and will have to catch up on material from Year 1 in their own time to be able to demonstrate by the end of the Apprenticeship that they have covered the curriculum for both years. Gaps can also be filled in through workshops and personal learning outside the course, though this must be recorded and demonstrated to your mentor. 

Please also note that we can only accept students into Year 2 when space is available. We will prioritise continuing 1st Year students moving into Year 2. 

Feel free to contact us if you have relevant Previous Experiential Learning (PEL) from other courses or life experience and are interested in starting in Year 2. 

Contact: Jane Wallwork

The Plant Medicine School Exmoor
The Exmoor Apothecary 
Little Hurstone
Waterrow
Wiveliscombe
Somerset
TA4 2AT
exmoor@theplantmedicineschool.com
01984 248308
07518 709972

Plant Medicine School Scotland (est. 2021)

The Plant Medicine School Scotland was set up in 2021 in response to the growing demand for apprenticeship and clinical training programmes. It is a collaboration between the Plant Medicine School in Hollyfort & Grass Roots Remedies Co-operative in Edinburgh & Glasgow.

Grass Roots Remedies Cooperative lead the School in Scotland

Link to the Grassroots site ‘About Us’ page.

Course Mentors - Scotland – Bio’s are on the ‘About Page’

Soraya Bishop

Ally Hurčíková

Rhona Donaldson

Catriona Gibson

Fees:

The fees are £1,750 per year in Scotland - this is slightly higher than other Plant Medicine School programmes to allow for our additional cost of hiring a venue for the intensives.

The fees cover access to online material, including videos, lectures and notes; mentoring; zoom meetings, venue hire for the in-person intensives and all materials used in these classes. It includes a vegan lunch for each study day and refreshments.

The course fees are paid as follows:

·      An initial non-refundable payment of £250 secures your place, covers administration and gives access to the At Home With Herbs Course.

·      Then you can pay the remaining balance (£1500) in either 1 or 3 instalments. If you pay in 3 instalments, an extra £25 is added to each instalment.

 

Additional Costs for Students:

Location and accommodation:

·      Travel to the Autumn & Summer intensives: these will be at a central Scotland location, confirmed before the course starts.

·      Accommodation at the intensives: options will include: finding your own accommodation, travelling in from home each day, or you may choose to stay at the venue & camp or stay in your own live-in vehicle. It will cost approximately £10 per night if you stay at the venue.

Books and Equipment

·      Books: you may wish to purchase additional books for the course, in Year 1 there is no compulsory reading and in Year 2 there are 2 compulsory texts.

·      Equipment: in order to make your own medicines at home, you may want to purchase some additional equipment. The equipment you may wish to buy is listed in Appendix 2 of the Student Information Pack.

 

Recognition of PEL for course entry in the second year

Year 2 if they can demonstrate relevant Prior Experiential Learning (PEL) which covers the curriculum for Year 1.

For previous Grass Roots Remedies Co-operative graduates of the Wild Things: A Year of Wild Food & Medicine Course (Year 2), it is possible to go into Year 2 of the Apprenticeship using this as PEL, though there will be some gaps in the curriculum as the two courses are not equivalent.

Students who have started their studies in Year 2 will be given access to the Year 1 material and will have to catch up on material from Year 1 in their own time, to be able to demonstrate by the end of the Apprenticeship that they have covered the curriculum for both years. Gaps can also be filled in through workshops and personal learning outside of the course, though this must be recorded and demonstrated to your mentor.

Please also note that we can only accept students into Year 2 when there is space available for them. We will prioritise continuing 1st Year students moving into Year 2.

Feel free to contact us if you feel you have relevant Previous Experiential Learning (PEL) from other courses or life experience and are interested in starting in Year 2.

How Do I Book Onto the Course?

To enrol in the course contact us at scotland@theplantmedicineschool.com and request an application form.

CONTACT US - Grass Roots Remedies Co-op
c/o The Health Agency, Wester Hailes Healthy Living Centre, 30 Harvesters’ Way, Edinburgh, EH14 3JF

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Plant Medicine School Wexford

Course leader

Nikki Darrell

Mentors

Silja Harms, Chelley O’Donovan, and Tiarnan O’Sullivan.

Bios are in ‘The Team’ section of the website

Fees

The fees are €1800.00 per year (€3,600.00 in total), although there is a small admin fee in addition if paying in instalments.

Location and accommodation:

Grá Nádúr Grovemill Hollyfort Gorey County Wexford Y25C6N1

We do not provide accommodation, but there is a wide range available in the area.

Recognition of PEL for course entry in the second year

Prospective Students can go directly into Year 2 if they can demonstrate relevant Prior Experiential Learning (PEL), which covers the curriculum for Year 1. The onus is upon the applicant to present their PEL with relevant documentation.

Students who have started their studies in Year 2 will be given access to the Year 1 material and will have to catch up on material from Year 1 in their own time to be able to demonstrate by the end of the Apprenticeship that they have covered the curriculum for both years. Gaps can also be filled in through workshops and personal learning outside of the course, though this has to be recorded and demonstrated to your mentor. 

Please also note that we can only accept students into Year 2 when there is space available for them. We will prioritise continuing 1st Year students moving into Year 2. 

Feel free to contact us if you feel you have relevant Previous Experiential Learning (PEL) from other courses or life experience and are interested in starting in Year 2. 

 


The Plant Medicine School Wexford

Grá Nádúr

Grovemill

Hollyfort

Gorey

Co. Wexford

Ireland
Y25 C6N1


Google map link - https://goo.gl/maps/JhAe6Z41UW4i7Vdm9
 
team@theplantmedicineschool.com
https://theplantmedicineschool.com

 
Tel international +353 (87) 340 2442
Tel National (087) 340 2442

Tel international landline +353 (53) 942 8481
Tel National landline (053) 942 8481
10:00 - 17:00 GMT

 

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Courses ~ Traditional Herbal and Botanical Medicine Apprenticeship, Clinical Herbal Practitioner Training, Aromatherapy and Aromatic Medicine Training, Continuing Herbal Professional Development for Herbalists in Ireland (Ire), in the United Kingdom (UK) and in Europe (EU), Face to Face Learning, Blended Learning, Courses in Herbalism, Herbal Medicine and Herbalist Training, online and face to face located in Grá Nádúr, Hollyfort, Gorey, Co. Wexford, Y25 C6N1. Ireland.